Are cosmic collisions common? (2)

“In 1990, Victor Clube, an astrophysicist, and Bill Napier, an astronomer, published The Cosmic Winter, a book in which they describe performing orbital analyses of several of the meteor showers that hit Earth every year.”

“Many meteor showers are related to one another, such as the Taurids, Perseids, and Orionids. In addition, some very large cosmic objects are related: the comets Encke and Rudnicki, the asteroids Oljato, Hephaistos, and about 100 others. Every one of these 100-plus cosmic bodies is at least half a mile in diameter and some are miles wide. And what do they have in common?

According to those scientists, every one is the offspring of the same massive comet that first entered our system less than 20,000 years ago! Clube and Napier calculated that, to account for all the debris they found strewn throughout our solar system, the original comet had to have been enormous.”

“We are very likely seeing the leftover debris from a monster comet that finished off 40 million animals 13,000 years ago.”

“Clube and Napier calculated that , because of the subtle changes in the orbits of Earth and the remaining cosmic debris, Earth crosses through the densest part of the giant comet clouds about every 2,000 to 4,000 years. When we look at climate and ice-core records, we can see that pattern. For example, the iridium, helium-3, nitrate, ammonium, and other key measurements seem to rise and fall in tandem, producing noticeable peaks around 18,000, 16,000, 13,000, 9,000, 5,000, and 2,000 years ago. In that pattern of peaks every 2,000 to 4,000 years, we may be seeing the ‘calling cards’ of the returning megacomet.”

(These are also extracts from Firestone, West, and Warwick-Smith’s ‘The Cycle of Cosmic Catastrophes: Flood, fire, and famine in the history of civilisation.’

Some years ago, when I became interested in cosmic impacts on Earth of great magnitude, and on ice ages (there being little agreement on how many we have had in recent periods, and on the causes of ice ages), I became aware that there seem to have been a few cosmic catastrophes since our current civilisation began about 8,000 BC.

We are so advanced technologically, and greedily so, that we care not that our house of straw cards may go up in flames, taking us with it. Again!)