Ancient agriculture – the missing links

“Our ancestors found themselves in a world full of natural wonders, facing the challenge that nature set before them, all having to do with basic survival. … … We know exactly how Stone Age people lived because many tribes around the world were still living in this manner during the past five hundred years, and they have been studied intensively and extensively.

We know that humanity was fairly homogeneous throughout the Stone Age. … … They lived very close to nature, hunting wild life and gathering wild plants, using stone tools and stone, wood, and bone weapons. They had learned the art of making and controlling fire, and they had very accurate and detailed knowledge about the habits of animals, the lay of the land, nature’s cycles, and how to distinguish between edible and poisonous plants. … …

Suddenly, a few tribes began to embrace a different way of life. Giving up their nomadic existence, they settled down and started raising certain crops and domesticating several animal species. The first steps towards civilisation are often described but never really examined at a deep level. What compelled them to change abruptly? …

The first issue is very basic and straightforward. Stone Age people did not eat grains, and grains are the basis of agriculture and the diet of civilisation. Their diet consisted of lean wild meats and fresh wild greens and fruits. … …

How did our ancestor make this leap? As they had little to no experience with wild grains, how did they know what to do to process them, or even that they were indeed edible? … Beyond that, by the time of the abrupt appearance of the Sumerian and Egyptian civilisations, grains had already been hybridized, which demands a high degree of knowledge about and experience with plants, as well as time. … …

How and why did humans who had known nothing but a nomadic existence and an egalitarian social structure, so quickly and so radically change? What compelled them to build cities and create highly stratified civilisations when they knew nothing about such organisations? … … the developmental phases are simply not there. … …

Where did they learn to hybridize bread wheat and turn it into flour and bake the flour into bread in such a short time? Ditto for viticulture. These are not simple or obvious products.”

These are extracts from ‘Ancient agriculture, in search of the missing links’ by Will Hart in ‘Forbidden History’ edited by J. Douglas Kenyon.

If extraterrestrials had not been responsible for the sudden jump to settlement and agriculture, one would need to speculate that, somehow, remnants of a hitherto unknown civilisation from the era preceding the horrendous cosmic cataclysm and the resulting Universal Flood, of between 11,500 to 13,000 years ago, had stepped up to guide the Stone Age people of the current civilisation from their post-Deluge primitive lives.

If significant events in the Cosmos are cyclical in their occurrence, has the trajectory of mankind followed a cyclical path already?