Mafia jokes

What is the difference between the government and the Mafia?
One of them is organized.

Shared by NumeroOcho

How many Mafia hitmen does it take to change a light bulb?
Three. One to screw it in, one to watch, and one to shoot the witness!

Shared by JustMe

How many mafia guys does it take to change a light bulb?
…you gotta problem with the light bulb!?

Shared by a contributor

 

ow many men do you need for a mafia funeral?
Just one. To slam the car trunk shut.

Shared by Argo

 

How do you know if a Pole is at a cockfight?
He’s the one with a duck.
How do you know if an Italian is there?
He bets on the duck.
How do you know if the Mafia is there?
The duck wins.

Shared by NumeroOcho

 

Why do wise guy and wise man mean totally different things?

 

Challenging deconstruction – Part 2

The rest of my writing is covered here.

1) The Dance of Destiny
Having been well-educated by British colonialism, buffeted (but not damaged) by ignorance in a relatively new nation set in coloured seas and surrounded by foreign but ancient and durable cultures, risen to leadership positions in both civil society (through a highly interactive and contributory life) and in the federal public service, and sporadically falling into holes which were certainly not there, and also experiencing the wheels of my life-chances cart falling off for no discernible cause, I had to ask: ‘What determines human life on Earth?’

Trekking through the maya of history, geography, sociology, significant psychic experiences and personal relations of some import, I came to postulate how a personal destiny might evolve. I drew upon Hinduism, not on the New Age modifications. Increasingly, I speculate whether, like the nested fields of force in physics, there may be a nested network of human destinies, leading to one which encompasses the Cosmos as a whole. Thus, this book is much more than a memoir.

Necessarily and intuitively, I have woven through my narrative some Eastern (mainly Hindu) spirituality. Supportive endorsements again followed. The US Review of Books recommended the book, previously supported by Kirkus Discoveries and BookRead.com.

2) Pithy perspectives: a smorgasbord of short, short stories
This book was written for fun. It was reviewed by the NSW State President of the Federation of Australian Writers. He describes the stories as “interesting,” “crazy, frightening, weird, some really lovely,” “a clever book.” The last story in the book (“quite intriguing,” “so different”) ends in a spiritual haze which envelops cats, mice, and a little girl who understands the language of animals.

The book was also favourably reviewed by the US Review of Books.

3) Musings at Death’s Door: an ancient, bicultural Asian-Australian ponders about Australian society
This is a hard-hitting, no-punches-pulled summary of my lived-through observations, gathered over more than 6 decades as an adult, culminating with a view on the place of religion in human lives, and the place of mankind in the Cosmos. Not unexpectedly, my perceptual stance is bicultural, since I was well soaked in Asia’s communitarian spirituality before I arrived in Australia, while becoming grounded firmly in the operational requirements of the Western world through more than 6 decades of a participatory life in a nation reflecting the primacy of individualism.

This book highlights what the Australian media has identified as the racket of asylum seeking (now re-affirmed by the current government), with little to no evidence that the vociferous supporters of an open door to all asylum seekers are adequately aware of the national interest. I argue for due process to enable those who have a genuine fear of persecution in their country of nationality to be granted necessary succour. The book is also critical of those who seek to retain their cultural separation even after the third generation has merged with the rest of the population; we are already an integrated multi-ethnic people. The book compares the subservience of Australia’s politicians kow-towing to powerful interests to the stand-tall stance of its workers (who could thereby be a beacon to our neighbours). I also examine empires gone and going, as well as the sham of Western democracy, and a number of other issues of societal relevance.

On the other hand, I do highlight the commendable aspects of my adopted nation, of which I am proud. We can be a beacon of tolerance and equal opportunity.

An endorsement by a professor of history and politics says “ … there is wisdom here … this book is rich, intelligent and provocative. A major contribution to Australian culture.” This book was also Recommended by the US Review of Books.

These books are available as ebooks for deconstruction or to be read for information and/or pleasure at Amazon Kindle Direct at $US 2.99 each.

Other writing
I have had a few articles relating to migrant settlement issues published in: ‘Asia Sentinel,’ ‘Malaysian Insider,’ ‘Webdiary,’ and the Multicultural Writers Association of Australia’s anthology “Culture is … “. The Eurobodalla Writers’ recent anthology “Where penguins fly” includes 3 pieces of fiction by me.

More recently, I have had 44 short articles published on http://www.ezinearticles.com on a wide range of issues, most open-ended, thereby inviting intelligent readers to reach their own conclusions.
For further background, refer http://www.dragonraj.com and http://www.independentauthornetwork.com .

What my book ‘Musings at Death’s Door’ is about

Musings at Death’s Door: an ancient, bicultural Asian-Australian ponders about Australian society

This is a hard-hitting, no-punches-pulled summary, presented in the form of brief essays, of my lived-through observations, gathered over more than 6 decades, as an adult in Australia, culminating with a view on the place of religion in human lives, and the place of mankind in the Cosmos. Not unexpectedly, my perceptual stance is bicultural, since I was well soaked, during my formative years, in Asia’s communitarian spirituality, while subsequently grounded firmly in the operational requirements of the Western world.

This book highlights issues of concern to me, while I await the wings which will take me to my next (temporary) abode.  These issues include: the racket of asylum seeking, vociferously supported by only a small local minority, who have yet to explain, in the national interest, the budgetary and inter-community relations consequences; the motivation of those who seek to flaunt cultural differences; the subservience of Australia’s politicians, in contrast to the stand-tall ethos of the traditional Australian worker (who could also be a beacon to our neighbours); and, among other issues, the presumption that Western democracy as currently practised represents the best form of governance.

 I also touch upon the difference between traditional empires of history (based on direct control), all of which went the way of the dodo (and whose respective duration was presumably affected by planetary cycles), and the current hegemonic empire based on influence. Since Australia is already a happy satrapy, and also for other pragmatic reasons of a sociological nature, I recommend that we become the next state of the USA, with mutual benefit.

 Continuing my end-of-life but progressive thoughts, I do highlight the many commendable aspects of my adopted nation, of which I am quite proud. However, to maintain a proper perspective, this book is dedicated to my ancestors and successors.

 A pre-publication endorsement by a prominent professor of history and politics (one of our true intellectuals) says “ … there is wisdom here … this book is rich, intelligent and provocative. A major contribution to Australian culture.” This book was also Recommended by the US Review of Books.

 

From satrapy to new state

Most thinking people might concur that a benign foreign influence is likely to be an advantage to a small nation. Australia is guided in its foreign relations by its protector and benefactor, the USA. This ‘godfather’ nation will protect us militarily, as our neighbours do not have a natural affinity with our culture, and have not been bonded with us historically. As identified by a former prime minister, history over-rides geography. In return, we facilitate certain logistical transactions by the USA in its role of enhancing political freedom and human rights in regions of interest to the Western world.

Contrary to the chauvinistic and somewhat idealistic utterances by some in the media and the political commentariat, Australia is a satrapy. That is, we are free to govern ourselves as long as we give due regard to the wishes of our protector, without whose investments we would be so much poorer economically. American interests already own significant segments of Australian industry, having initially established it securely following World War 2.

It does not require much perspicacity to realise that the USA is the latest emperor on Earth; but unlike all its predecessors, it operates a hegemonic empire, an empire of only influence, not direct control.

Culturally, increasing American influence is reflected through our tv programs; our speech, especially through the proliferating ‘nairies’ (like ordinairy) and ‘tauries’ (like Territaury); our foods; our music; our clothing  styles (hoodies, or shirt tails hanging outside the jeans and visible under a jacket); our love of convoluted jargon phrases (regrettably devaluing the simplicity and clarity of an otherwise  expressive language); our support for America’s wars; and our understanding of US policies in the UN, especially on Middle Eastern affairs.

I think that it is time for us to seek to join the USA as its new state. Heresy? Not so! This will offer substantial benefits. Read ‘Of empires gone and going’ in Musings at Death’s Door (Recommended by the US Review of Books).