Were the planets closer to Earth once?

In historical times, when the planets were described (in mythology) as gods, were they closer to Earth than they are now? Were they described as being at war with one another, because of the terrible exchanges of lightning which reportedly took place? Was this how propitiation of the planets began?

Does this explain the commonality of the pantheons of gods to which all humans paid homage, except that the names of the gods reflected differences in language? Presumably, travellers and mystics contributed to some inter-tribal (inter-cultural) learning; that is, to the diffusion of belief about the Cosmos.

I instance the spread of Hindu beliefs, texts, and practices all the way from India to the South China Sea, and as far as the island of Bali in Indonesia. Even after the spread of Islam to Indonesia, Hinduism’s Ramayana, a most-durable epic, continues to be celebrated (as I discovered) in Bali – and in Buddhist Thailand. Perhaps matters human override matters religious in the realm of guidance for living – as the gods seemed to be at war with one another.

The only way our planets could have been closer to one another is through being pulled out of their normal orbits by a very, very huge intruder from space passing through our solar system. As I wrote in an earlier post, a remnant of a supernova has been held to have been responsible for a number of inconsistent aspects of this system:

  • Pluto, one of Neptune’s moons, pulled into a planetary orbit
  • the ‘equatorial alignment’ of Uranus changed, and its moon damaged
  • Saturn’s moon Chiron pulled away
  • Tiamat, a planet similar to Jupiter and Saturn, with an orbit between these two, believed to have been destroyed by Marduk/Phaeton (the supernova remnant), resulting in an asteroid belt in its place
  • Mars – orbit changed
  • Phaeton ‘rampaged near Earth only some 11,500 years ago’
  • Venus – its rotational spin reversed

(refer Allan & Delair in ‘Cataclysm,’ who relied on ‘Sumerian texts and recent astronomical data’)

This scenario does not, however, imply that the planets were once closer to Earth (as I have read elsewhere). Such proximity could only have occurred during the formative years of the solar system. But then there would have been no humans around. How then did this mythology develop?

The simpler explanation lies in errors in interpretation of ancient mythology. As well, the Sumerians’ writings are far too recent. Another explanation would be that nearby extra-terrestrials (on a Sirius planet?) were witness to this ‘war’.

Phaeton’s passage through the settled solar system is the most likely source of the claim of a celestial war. From our point of view, this event, believed to have occurred at about 11,500 years ago, seems to have coincided with the universal flood. This is believed to have occurred between 11,500 and 13,000 years ago. Phaeton’s rampage would explain this flood too (refer my earlier post).

Another major cosmic catastrophe is expected relatively soon by a barrage of expert researchers – from a variety of causes. We will not be taking our wealth, or theological differences, or any right to rule others, with us; only our soul memories.

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Poetry with rhyme and rhythm (1)

I realise that I am unable to write proper poetry; that is, poetry displaying rhyme and rhythm.

I wish I could write like this.

The Ballad Of The Turkey

© G Yates

Published on February 2006

As I walked along the road one day
Kicking up stones along the way,
I saw a bird of unusual size
Who had a large beak and small, beady eyes.

He strutted about and ruffled his wings
Then he did the most ominous thing.
He let out a screech and puffed out his chest
I wanted to run from this evil pest.

As this bird’s mighty exterior did appear
The inside of my chest was filled with fear.
He put one talon forward, the other one next
This troublesome bird was making me vexed.

I then did something that was a great chance.
I kicked a stone at him to stop his advance.
He then chased the stone, oh joy of great joys!
I felt myself one of the luckiest boys!

Around the corner I ran, straight to my home,
Leaving that bird confused and alone.
Don’t befriend a turkey (for that’s what he was)
Or he will attack you simply because.

Source: http://www.familyfriendpoems.com/poem/the-ballad-of-the-turkey

 

Does my soul influence my mind?

The soul is believed to be a living entity whose existence transcends time; where time is a record of a sequence of events. The soul would be the etheric, essential core of each human being, said by Hinduism to reside within the heart of each of its embodiments on Earth; and to leave each body at death.

The mind is (in my limited experience) an integral component of a single Earthly life of a human being. After bodily death, together with the memories it had accumulated during that life, it seems to be carried into the After-life with the insubstantial spirit of the former human being, but not into the next Earthly life.

Can (or does) the soul, with its accumulated memories of multiple lifetimes (or a record of the pathway traversed) communicate with the mind of its current incarnation during the life of that embodiment?

The above concept of soul is held by, at least, the forest religions of Asia and their adherents; as well as by independent thinkers who accept that a continuity of human existence on Earth (or possibly elsewhere) is more meaningful than a single life with neither history nor future.

As for the mind, the spirit of my uncle (sent by ‘higher beings’ to guide me spiritually – refer my earlier posts) demonstrated both the ability to communicate silently with a clairvoyant (a transaction between minds), and the retention of his Earthly memory – all without a brain as we know it. As well, at re-birth, human beings do not remember their experiences and memories of the preceding Earthly existence.

A few children who remember (up to age 6 or thereabouts) some aspects of a previous life are exceptions – which also validate the reincarnation process.

To add further depth to the concept of mind, Hinduism advises that the human mind is only an instrument of Consciousness; and that Consciousness is the source of all that is in the Cosmos, and which pervades all existence ephemerally.

Is Consciousness then that which links all existence insubstantially, enabling connections to be sensed by components of life? Would this enable my soul to guide me in each embodied life, were I to seek such an input? After all, my soul is indeed the essential ME, with my current body of form and substance a temporary Earthly extension; and in need of guidance.

Fragmentary glimpses of a past life have arisen through my efforts, via auto-hypnosis, to view where I have been and what I did. Significantly, 2 clairvoyants, claiming to be able to perceive a couple of my past lives, with help from their spirit guides, have confirmed at least one of my past lives. This is supported by a sort of ‘gut feeling’ I have about that life.

Did my soul participate in this matter? That raises 2 important issues. During a course at a yoga ashram on meditation, we were repeatedly asked “Who is the Watcher?” This is a profoundly interesting concept; that behind our thoughts and actions stands a part of us which is aware of what is happening. This seems to be close to conscience, whose origin may not all be learned.

Strangely, on the 2 occasions during my life when I displayed great anger, another part of me clearly said “What are you doing?” For that to happen, there has to be a third part of me viewing this play.

Another reason for somehow becoming aware oF a past life would be to outgrow certain attitudes which may have been appropriate in that life, but which need to be discarded to enable progress morally. For example, if I have fought for justice in my previous life, I would now have to learn to work for justice.

As Dr. Radhakrishnan, a former President of India, said, “We are born, not to  enjoy life, but to learn.” But, why not combine the two?

 

A poem about spirituality

The Sign

© Jeff Bresee   (Published on December 2008)

I wake to find a scene unkind, on vessel I do stand.
Adrift at sea; lost, scared and cold; in desperate need of land.

From whence came I? What purpose here? Which course should I set sail?
My heart longs after former home, yet all my senses fail.

Rotating, searching, looking out; no means to tell the way.
And so I drift with every wind, more helpless day by day.

Shall this continue endlessly? Shall sea become despair?
A purpose there must surely be, a course to chart…but where?

Then pausing, pondering, opening up…a prompting, “Look above”.
In yonder sky, a wisp of white, a sign of hope: a dove.

“Set sail”, my heart cries. “Follow thence. T’wil surely guide to shore”.
Yet speed I’ve not. I fall behind. The sign I see no more.

But all’s not lost. The way I know and if to this course I’m true.
Then home I shall be once again…my mansion built anew.

Source: http://www.familyfriendpoems.com/poem/the-sign

 

The traveler, the trader, the marauder

Some young children love exploring – when they are allowed to do so. Some youths need to test something within themselves by undergoing clearly risky pastimes or endeavours.

I instance my (one and only) son, who decided, at age 17, to go wild water rafting. With 2 friends, without any relevant experience, they took on the Franklin River, said to be a very dangerous river to navigate on flimsy rafts.

When he left, my wife and I did wonder whether we would see him again. Having brought up our children, who did display early in life a risk-taking nature, to be self-confident, competent, yet careful, he was free, even at that age, to take on the world – if he wanted to (after due consideration).

Throughout the history of Man, either as individuals or in groups, men have travelled long distances – over the land or by sea – to explore or trade. Those who survived learnt about other peoples and their cultures and/or influenced those others with their own beliefs and values. This exchange would be osmotic and peaceful.

Since humans are a greedy species, there have also been, all over the world, almost interminable invasions, brutal wars, and forced religious conversions. Two of the desert religions top the list for rapacious performance over quite a number of recent centuries. The people who were responsible for most of the recorded depredations came out of small tribal nations in Europe: Europe itself being a relatively small peninsula jutting out of the massive continent of Asia.

They were aided by new and powerful weaponry when they went initially to explore, then trade; marauding came naturally when their animal instincts exploited opportunities for subjugation of the peoples they traded with. Traditional economies were destroyed, and much injustice was imposed upon the so-called ‘natives,’ including conversion to a faith offering no more than the prevailing ones; often less. Ask the indigenes of North America and Australia to begin with.

Now the marauders are toothless, and back at home. Yet, the new emperor in the West, the hegemonic one, has harnessed them into a modern aggressive force; but this team lacks a coherent capacity to bite anyone powerful. As with the failed British invasion of Afghanistan in recent history, there may now be another toothless retreat, especially from the Middle East.

The guise of diplomacy can provide a necessary cover. In the long run, only negotiation can provide the pathway to peace with a necessary co-existence.

Former colonies of the USA

Africa

  •  Liberia (1821–47) – Liberia was never officially claimed by the United States. Rather it was founded by the American Colonization Society, a private American civilian organization.

Asia

North America

Oceania

South America

(Source: Wikipedia)

 

(Comment:  Even the USA, which posits itself as representing freedom, was slow in releasing control over some of its territories. Since then it has become one of the neo-colonisers of the West. Having acquired a new kind of empire – the hegemonic empire, one based on influence rather than on control – it offers protection to nations such as Australia.

Whether it ends up as one of the many brief empires of history depends essentially upon the movements of our planets. How  predictable are such movements, and their potential impacts?  Could they depend  on God’s Will?  

Could hegemonic empires be replaced by co-prosperity spheres of the kind Japan had in mind?)

 

Former Spanish colonies

FORMER  SPANISH  COLONIES

(From Wikipedia)

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

J

L

M

N

O

P

R

S

T

U

V

W

 

It is interesting to see the changing face of European colonialism.  First, Portugal breaks out as a new State from Spain; then goes on the rampage all over the world – only to be cutback by other marauders (sorry, explorers and traders), especially Spain – all of whom pray to the same god.  The planets have no respect for our insubstantial god, do they?

Then, other marauders, especially England and the Netherlands, rob Spanish carriers of loot from the Americas.  Without this loot, Europe would not have been able to finance its trade and economic development, especially through the money changers authorised by the Pope.

So much misgotten wealth, leading to so much suffering by the ‘natives everywhere,’ who were  overcome by such superior white fellows, and their arrogant and misdirected priests.          

 

Former colonies of Portugal

In Africa

Portuguese presence in Africa started in 1415 with the conquest of Ceuta and is generally viewed as ending in 1975, with the independence of its later colonies, although the present autonomous region of Madeira is located in the African Plate, some 650 km (360 mi) off the North African coast, Madeira belongs and has always belonged ethnically, culturally, economically and politically to Europe, some 955 km (583 mi) from the European mainland.

  • Angola/Portuguese West Africa: colony (1575–1589); crown colony (1589–1951); overseas province (1951–1971); state (1971–1975). Independence in 1975.
  • Arguin/Arguim: (1455–1633)
  • Accra: (1557–1578)
  • Cabinda: protectorate (1883–1887); Congo district (1887–1921); intendancy subordinate to Maquela (1921–1922); dependency of Zaire district (1922–1930); Intendacy of Zaire and Cabinda (1930–1932); intendancy under Portuguese Angola (1932–1934); dependency under Angola (1934–1945); restored as District (1946–1975). Controlled by Frente Nacional para a Libertação de Angola (National Liberation Front of Angola) as part of independent Angola in 1975. Declared Cabinda a Republic in 1975, but not recognized by Portugal nor Angola.
  • Cabo Verde/Cape Verde: settlements (1462–1495); dominion of crown colonies (1495–1587); crown colony (1587–1951); overseas province (1951–1974); autonomous republic (1974–1975). Independence in 1975.
  • Ceuta: possession (1415–1640). Ceded to Spain in 1668.
  • Elmina: possession (1482–1637). Captured by the Dutch West Indies Company.
  • Fernando Pó and Annobón: colonies (1474–1778). Ceded to Spain in 1778.
  • Portuguese Gold Coast: (1482–1642), ceded to Dutch Gold Coast in 1642
  • Guiné Portuguesa/Portuguese Guinea: colony (1879–1951); overseas province (1951–1974). Unilateral independence declared in 1973, recognized by Portugal in 1974.
    • Cacheu: captaincy (1640–1879). United with Bissau in 1879.
    • Bissau: settlement under Cacheu (1687–1696); captaincy (1696–1707); abandoned (1707–1753); separate colony under Cape Verde (1753–1879). United with Cacheu in 1879.
  • Madagascar: southern part (1496–1550)
  • Madeira: possession (1418–1420); colony (1420–1580); crown colony (1580–1834); autonomous district (1834–1976). Made an autonomous region in 1976.
  • Mascarene Islands: fortified post (1498–1540)
  • Malindi: occupation (1500–1630)
  • Mombassa: occupation (1593–1638); colony subordinate to Goa, capital of Portuguese India (1638–1698; 1728–1729). Under Omani sovereignty in 1729.
  • Morocco enclaves
    • Aguz/Souira Guedima (1506–1525)
    • Alcácer Ceguer/El Qsar es Seghir (1458–1550)
    • Arzila/Asilah (1471–1550; 1577–1589). Restored to Morocco in 1589.
    • Azamor/Azemmour (1513–1541). City restored to Morocco in 1541.
    • Mazagan/El Jadida (1485–1550); possession (1506–1769). Incorporation into Morocco in 1769.
    • Mogador/Essaouira (1506–1510)
    • Safim/Safi (1488–1541)
    • Santa Cruz do Cabo de Gué/Agadir (1505–1541)
  • Moçambique/Portuguese East Africa: possession (1498–1501); subordinate to Goa (1501–1569); captaincy-general (1569–1609); colony subordinate to Goa (1609–1752); colony (1752–1951); overseas province (1951–1971); state (1971–1974); local transitional administration (1974–1975). Independence in 1975.
  • Ouadane (1487)
  • Quíloa (1505–1512)
  • São João Baptista de Ajudá: colonial fort (1680-c.1700); fort subordinate to the Portuguese colony of Brazil (1721–1730); fort administered by colonial governor (1730-1858) subordinate to Portuguese São Tomé and Príncipe (1865–1869). Fort re-established under separate administration (1872-1961). Annexed by Dahomey in 1961.
  • São Tomé and Príncipe/São Tomé e Príncipe: crown colony (1753–1951); overseas province (1951–1971); local administration (1971–1975). Independence in 1975.
    • São Tomé: possession (1470–1485); colony (1485–1522); crown colony (1522–1641); administration under Dutch occupation (1641–1648). French occupation in 1648.
    • Príncipe: colony (1471–1753). United with São Tomé in 1753.
  • Tangier: possession (1471–1662). Ceded to England in 1662.
  • Zanzibar: possession (1503–1698). Became part of Oman in 1698.
  • Ziguinchor: possession (1645–1888). Ceded to France in 1888.

North Atlantic and North America

The Azores were discovered early in the Discovery Ages. Labrador and Corte-Real brothers later explored and claimed Greenland and eastern modern Canada from 1499 to 1502.

In Central and South America

Brazil was explored and claimed in 1500, and become independent in 1822. Unlike the Spanish, the Portuguese did not divide its possession in South America in several vice-royalties.

  • Barbados: Possession known as Os Barbados, discovered by Pedro Campos in 1536 being an exile post for Brazilian Jews. The only Caribbean possession the Portuguese held for eighty-four years until Portugal abandoned the island to continue exploring nearby Brazil.
  • Brazil: possession known as Ilha de Santa Cruz, later Terra de Vera Cruz (1500–1530); colony (1530–1714); vice-kingdom (1714–1815); kingdom united with the Kingdom of Portugal (1815–1822), independence in 1822.
  • Cisplatina (Uruguay): occupation (1808–1822). Captaincy in 1817 (of the United Kingdom of Portugal, Brazil and the Algarves). Adhered as a province of the new Empire of Brazil in 1822. Became independent 1827, changing its name to Uruguay.
  • French Guiana: occupation (1809–1817). Restored to France in 1817.
  • Nova Colónia do Sacramento: colony in present Uruguay (1680; 1683–1705; 1715–1777). Ceded to the Spanish Empire in 1777.

In Asia and Oceania

India was reached by the Portuguese in 1498 by Vasco da Gama. Macau was the last possession in Asia and was handed over to the People’s Republic of China in 1999.

(From Wikipedia)

Portugal seems to have been the first European ‘cab off the rank’ to bully its way to ownership of lands occupied by coloured peoples all over the world.  How the mighty have fallen! The cyclical movement of our planets may explain the rise and fall of unwarranted ambitions.

 

Former Dutch colonies

North America:

Caribbean:

South America:

Africa:

Indian Ocean:

Middle East:

Indian Subcontinent

Asia-Pasific:

The country of New Zealand was named after the province Zeeland in the Netherlands and the island of Tasman was named after the Dutch explorer Abel Tasman who discovered and mapped out most of New Zealand, Australia and Tasman.

The country of Australia was also called New Holland. The first recorded European sighting of the Australian mainland was made by the Dutch navigator Willem Janszoon, who sighted the coast of Cape York Peninsula in 1606. Willem Jansz. sailed on the ship Duyfken. During the 17th century, the Dutch charted the whole of the western and northern coastlines of what they called New Holland, but they made no attempt at settlement.

(From Wikipedia)

It is amazing that a small nation like the Netherlands should have been able to acquire an empire.  But it is a fact that in the 17th  century, the Dutch ruled the seas.