A little Christmas hope

“Don’t be silly, child”, said her mother to Lucy. “There are no angels.” On sighting the
shocked face on the little girl, she went on to say, with more kindness in her voice, “I’m
sorry to tell you this, love, but you cannot see anyone or anything, can you?”

The mother was right. In the darkness which had surrounded her since birth (and before),
Lucy could perceive no objects, that is, anything with form. Indeed, both shape and
substance define objects, do they not? How then did Lucy ‘see’ this shimmering persona
who had recently begun to ‘appear’ before her, not only by day, but also during her
sleep?

Had this strange capacity to ‘see’ in an eyeless way existed during her stay in her
mother’s womb? Scientists are no wiser in answering this question as they are with the
preceding question. On the other hand, psychics claim that eyesight is only one way of
seeing. And there is some casual, non-repeatable evidence to support that view.

Amidst the confusion created by the purveyors of institutional religion as to when the
soul enters a living human, and similar semantic definitional issues, there is clear
evidence (again both casual and non-repeatable in a scientific sense) that a new-born
human baby can soon display both memory and a sense of justice. Recently, little babies
have been observed to avoid (that is, to look away from) unjust, unfair or bullying
characters depicted in cartoons on children’s tv. And any adult who can remember being
a child, or who has observed children carefully, can confirm that many very young
children do display a sense of justice which is clearly innate or inbuilt; that is, without
any prior learning or experience.

Metaphysical issues aside, little Lucy, abandoned at birth because of her blindness, and
subsequently adopted by an older couple, was now seemingly talking to a friend who is
neither visible nor audible to her parents. Fearing that the child might take refuge from
the material world in the world of her mind, her practical parents sought to ground her,
gently but realistically, in the inhospitable and unkind world of deprivation, cruelty, and
other very human attributes.

But, Lucy was not so easily deflected. One day, she said to her mother, “My friend
Angie says that she is here to look after me.” To this, her mother replied, “Your father
and I say ‘Thank God for that.’ We could all do with some help in difficult times.” Even
as she thus responded, she feared that her little one might be sorely disappointed. Lucy
went on to say “On Christmas Eve, Angie will take me with her on a trip to help other
children like me.” What was her adopted mother to say to that? She did the only thing
that anyone in such a confusing situation could do. She prayed – and prayed. But, could
that deflect an angel from implementing her charter?

What Lucy could see in her mind’s eye was a tiny shimmering silvery presence. If she
had sight, she might one day observe something similar – the sunlight sparkling sinuously
on slow moving water in a manner which satisfies the souls of sensitive humans.
Without any words, Lucy and the presence she named Angie continued to exchange
thoughts, in the manner of a clairvoyant conversing with the souls of persons now dead.

One day, Angie said to Lucy, “The real world is what it is. It must remain so. However,
on special occasions, we can stop time, and share wondrous experiences with those who
do need such experiences to lift their spirits.” Somehow, little Lucy understood.

So it was with joy in her heart that Lucy looked forward to Christmas Eve. On that night,
for a while, time did stand still. Angie appeared before Lucy and took her by the hand.
She then mysteriously led her on a tour of all those places in the world where little
children were in dire need of sustenance or solace. Accompanied by a host of other
shimmering presences, they were magically able to lift the spirits of these children in
their sleep.

When the sun rose sequentially in these hitherto sad places, the children faced a new day
(and the rest of their lives) with more hope than they had previously held. And both
Angie and Lucy were pleased at this role of Christmas – of uplifting the human spirit.

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